“They wanted others to know about their experiences.”

Documentary film program alumni Jeng-Tyng Hong and Matthew Claiborne, both class of 2013, spent their time at Columbia Journalism School working on a short documentary about the use of solitary confinement in New York prisons. They screened their film at the Catskill Mountains Film Festival and their characters use the film to raise awareness about fair treatment in prison. 

We interviewed Jeng-Tyng about their film, The Ex-Periment, and what they learned during production.

(more…)

Share

50 Children. 50 Cameras.

Francis and Stephanie Lane are the founders of Silent Tapes, a non-profit that uses photography to document the lives of people in various slums around the world. Their latest project will take place this summer in the favelas of Fortaleza, Brazil, where they will lead a five-week photography workshop for 50 children.

“It all comes down to building trust.”

Luke Malone, CUJ ’13, is an Australian journalist based in New York City, and the producer of “Secrets of the Living Dolls,” a documentary that features men who dress up in elaborate latex female bodysuits.

(more…)

“I’m always trying to find other ways to fund my work”

Documentary photographer Diana Markosian talks about making a living as a freelance photographer.

COVERING SENSITIVE Populations: Working with People Who Are Homeless

We spoke with photojournalist Andrew Holbrooke about his approach to working with people who are homeless and the ethical dilemmas he faced. This post is part two of our Covering Sensitive Populations series, where we help dissect the intricacies of working with subjects that may be made vulnerable to media attention.

“I understood how afraid of the world they were”

Photographer Jessica Dimmock gave CV insight into the production of her project, "The Ninth Floor."

“Be prepared for the unexpected”

Photojournalist Diana Markosian talks about turning a passion into a full-time job.

Student Access

Getting access to a story isn't a simple task, and for students it can be the most intimidating part of reporting.